ancientart
ancientart:

Commodus as Hercules. Marble Roman bust of emperor Commodus as Hercules. Accordingly, Commodus is dressed in lion skin, holding a club in one hand, and the apples of the Hesperides in the other. 191-192 AD.
The following are segments from the ancient Roman Historia Augusta, The Life of Commodus, dating to about the 4th century:

"He was called also the Roman Hercules, on the ground that he had killed wild beasts in the amphitheatre at Lanuvium; and, indeed, it was his custom to kill wild beasts on his own estate.
He pretended once that he was going to Africa, so that he could get funds for the journey, then got them and spent them on banquets and gaming instead. He murdered Motilenus, the prefect of the guard, by means of poisoned figs. He allowed statues of himself to be erected with the accoutrements of Hercules; and sacrifices were performed to him as to a god.”

Courtesy & currently located at the Capitoline Museum, Italy. Photo taken by cmgramse.





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ancientart:

Commodus as Hercules. Marble Roman bust of emperor Commodus as Hercules. Accordingly, Commodus is dressed in lion skin, holding a club in one hand, and the apples of the Hesperides in the other. 191-192 AD.

The following are segments from the ancient Roman Historia Augusta, The Life of Commodus, dating to about the 4th century:

"He was called also the Roman Hercules, on the ground that he had killed wild beasts in the amphitheatre at Lanuvium; and, indeed, it was his custom to kill wild beasts on his own estate.

He pretended once that he was going to Africa, so that he could get funds for the journey, then got them and spent them on banquets and gaming instead. He murdered Motilenus, the prefect of the guard, by means of poisoned figs. He allowed statues of himself to be erected with the accoutrements of Hercules; and sacrifices were performed to him as to a god.”

Courtesy & currently located at the Capitoline Museum, Italy. Photo taken by cmgramse.

(via TumbleOn)
ancientart

ancientart:

Din Lligwy, near the east coast of Anglesey, North Wales.

1905-1907 excavations uncovered hundreds of Roman period pottery sherds dating to the 3rd and 4th centuries CE. Animal bones have also been found at the site. Iron working and smithing appear to have been of Din Lligwy’s most important economic activities.

Despite the finds at the site being mostly Roman, the origins of the settlement may date back to the Iron age, when it was probably a small farming community.

The sign next to the ruins reads:

This is a well-preserved example of the type of defended settlement built by the native population of Anglesey during the latter part of the Roman occupation of Wales.

It consists of round and rectangular huts, probably not all put up at the same time, enclosed within a polygonal defensive wall. The principal period of occupation was during the 4th century AD.

Photos courtesy & taken by Richard Carter.

(via TumbleOn)
ancientart

ancientart:

Sections from Madaba Map mosaic in St. George’s church, an early Byzantine church at Madaba, Jordan. Dates to the 6th century AD. This map provides us with the earliest topographical description of Jerusalem.

The map mosaic in Madaba, dated 560-565 C.E. and depicting biblical lands from southern Syria to central Egypt, was discovered in 1884 and reported to the Greek Orthodox patriarch of Ottoman Jerusalem. New church construction destroyed almost 75% of the map, originally 22 by 7 meters. 

The much damaged fragment that remains indicates that the topical features were not chosen for their intrinsic importance, but also for their significance as sites of events mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, the Gospels, or church history.

-Trade, Travel, and Exploration in the Middle Ages: An Encyclopedia, pg 351.

Photos courtesy & taken by Roger Ulrich.

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neil-gaiman

odditiesoflife:

The Remarkable Dinosaur Footprint Wall

Located 3 miles (5 km) from Sucre, Bolivia is Cal Orko, an imposing limestone slab 0.9 miles (1.5 km) long and over 328 feet (100 m) high. On this steep face with an inclination of 72 degrees, visitors can look back in time to when dinosaurs roamed the Earth over 68 million years ago.

At Cal Orko you will find 462 distinct dinosaur tracks from at least 8 different species, totaling an incredible 5,055 dinosaur footprints. So how do thousands of dinosaur footprints come to be, on a seemingly vertical rock face hundreds of feet high? The location used to be the shore of a former lake, that attracted large numbers of dinosaurs.

The creatures’ feet sank into the shoreline in damp weather, leaving marks that were solidified by later periods of drought. Wet weather then returned, sealing the prints below mud and sediment. The wet-dry pattern was repeated several times, preserving multiple layers of prints. Tectonic upheaval then pushed the flat ground up to the brilliant viewing angle that it is today.

(via TumbleOn)